All posts tagged: Meta Moment

COMD 1103: F15

After asking for four years, I was given the chance to teach Foundation Drawing at City Tech! This is a class originally structured as an introduction to perspective and technical drawing, very rigid in its structure. I have found over the years that my students are coming in without a lot of the hand training they had in my day, so I messed with the syllabus a bit. I did not emphasis isometric projections, for instance. These students were so starved for basic perspective and beyond that PERMISSION TO DRAW AT ALL. There were people with a lot of anxiety around using their first pencil up, a terror of taking up too much material, space, and time. I countered this with a lot of pep talks, exhaustive handouts culled from the best sources, and by finding ways to just get them to draw until I could feel the room finally relax. 15 minutes of warm ups every class I started each class with warm ups which also gave the class time to sharpen pencils, settle down, …

Criteria for Internships/First Jobs

You may be new to the industry and inexperienced, but you need not suffer through useless or exploitative internships or first jobs. Yes, we do have bills to pay. Yes, we do need to pay our dues and earn our stripes–but there is no excuse when an employer mistreats you just because it can. Here are some tips gleaned from years of my own mistakes and observations. Criteria for Opportunities It offers a variety of work experiences, if that is what you are looking for. Smaller studios will be looking for people willing to do many things, so keep that in mind. It offers the opportunity to dive deeply into a subject, if that is what you are looking for. Larger studios will slot you into a team where you may not get to do a lot of different stuff, but you will get to have lots of specific experience in one or two things. There are great people with whom you can network and connect. This is the true benefit of these early experiences: the network you …

Presenting Your Work:
Ever Ready Info Kit

This is a massive subject, so read through everything and pick one facet to start on. DO NOT PANIC. Files to Always Have Ready: Varsity Level This is what I always have on cloud storage in case I find an opportunity. You can build up to this. General written documents, as Google docs: Your designer’s statement: why are you a designer? What do you want to do in the world? Have a point, do not be afraid to have a point of view!! One guide for writing one Some designer’s manifestos: 10 Examples  |  100 Years of Manifestos Contact information Professional email address: yourfullname@gmail.com Unprofessional: hottkittenz133$%4@aol.com Only give the basics: phone and email. Sometimes giving your address can make you less a contender if they think you live too far away or in a bad part of town. Your CV, with in-depth listings of all shows (solo and group), residencies, internships, publications, etc. This is a overall file of info you will use to create the smaller resumés CV stands for Curriculum Vitae, and it is basically a …

Asking (with Class) for Recommendation Letters

This summer, I was asked by several students for recommendation letters for jobs and other such opportunities. Each request resulted in a slightly different journey and I learned a lot from them all. I realized I need to come up with a policy for writing them, so I sent out word to all of my professor friends and did some research: there were a lot of horror stories and funny anecdotes. I could easily illustrate this essay with lots of eye-roll-inducing tales of badly mannered students and lazy professors, but I am taking a more positive approach: I am writing this essay for all of my former, current, and prospective students in hopes that I help you make better choices in this area. You are worth the effort, to a one. One thing: I mention “class” in the title. I am simply referring to the fact that you can, right here and now, choose to treat the people around you with respect and thereby slowly sculpt your life’s trajectory. You can be circumspect and polite, …