All posts filed under: Design

Design Philosophy

To design is to care, to educate, and to facilitate. I design to make myself a better person within a better world. I design to be of service to all around me as the design process teaches me circumspection and empathy every new day. The design process has given me a means of developing my ethos to an actual working system: I face every part of my life using it to guide me. If I frame the issue at hand as an issue I could

COMD Rebranding

In the fall of 2014, the Department of Advertising Design and Graphic Arts at City Tech was finally able to change its name to reflect the changing discipline and industry. Now the Department of Communication Design, we faculty needed to get the word out as quickly and seamlessly as possible. In 17 days, under the oversight of Prof. Anita Giraldo, we were able to take the initial idea (by Prof. Maria Giuliani) and work out the look and feel (myself). We then organized photos shoots using our students as eager models (Giraldo again), designed a print campaign of life-sized banners (myself), develop screen savers (Giuliani again), and finally developing an animation (Prof. Genevieve Hitchings). When we launched, every department computer had the informational screen savers in play and the banners were placed at key spots through the entire school.

Color Cards for Children: Prototype

I became a mother in 2012, and as my daughter has grown, I find myself designing playthings for her that I hope will give her tools to find her way into the world. These cards are the first prototype for a color kit I am designing, and I hope to print my first official sets in the coming year.

Living Lab Logo

I was asked to develop a logo that would represent “A Living Laboratory,” which is City Tech’s biggest grant. My solution represents the way the program has allowed so many of the college’s faculty to meet and talk. These conversations have enabled many of us to develop new interdisciplinary classes, lessons, and ideas. What is “A Living Laboratory”? The College’s biggest grant: a five-year $3.1M initiative (2010-2015) funded by the U.S. Department of Education Strengthening Hispanic-Serving Institutions (Title V) program. Our mission: to re-envision General Education as a “living laboratory” using City Tech’s signature strengths – hands-on experiential models of learning and our vibrant Brooklyn Waterfront location.

Open Lab Cards

These cards were designed by the Open Lab team to help instructors create whole new lessons based on game mechanics. I designed the cards while serving as the Outreach Lead.

FLIPPED! Panel at FIT EduTech Day

I was invited by CJ Yeh to speak on a panel about the flipped classroom for EduTech Day at FIT. We all spoke about how we are using websites and social media to buttress overall instruction. From the program: FLIPPED! Redefining the Classroom in the Age of Social Media The concept of “flipped classroom” inverts traditional teaching methods and transformed the role of a teacher from the sage on the stage to the guide on the side. The core concept is that students watch video lectures or read required texts online at home, and what takes place in the classroom will be concept engagement activities with the help of the instructor instead of lectures.

Bridging the Gap Poster

In over seven meetings during spring 2013, 35 City Tech faculty members across many disciplines explored and discussed the importance of prior knowledge, knowledge organization and feedback in order to promote a more effective teaching-learning environment. This poster shows how participating faculty reflected on three of the seven learning principles and plan to apply them to their teaching practice. Based on the work published by Susan A. Ambrose et al., “How Learning Works,” learning can be defined as a process leading to change that occurs as a consequence  of experience, which ultimately results in improved performance and retention and the desire to keep learning. I was one of the 37 participating faculty members, and I designed this poster with the input of a subgroup of the larger whole. We presented it in the 2013 City Tech Poster Session. Open Lab site for the project Full sized poster (PDF)

Playing with Type

Playing with Type: 50 graphic experiments for exploring typographic design principles “Playing with Type is a hands-on, playful approach to learning type application and principles. This engaging guide begins with an introduction to the philosophy of learning through the process of play. Along with a series of experimental design projects with an emphasis on type, the author provides designers with a “toolkit” of ideas and skills developed through the process of play. The awareness and sensitivity to type styles, forms, and type choices gained through these visual experiments will increase the designer’s confidence in their personal and professional work. This book can be used in the classroom or independently, and readers can go directly to exercises that appeal to them.” Lara McCormick, Rockport Publishers I was asked to contribute a free-form collage. My piece is featured on page 14.

Tomorrowland

Tomorrowland October 27 – December 8 Curated by Samantha Fields, this is a group exhibition featuring artists whose work depicts visions of future dystopias based on a turbulent present.  Desert wastelands, faux fallen satellites, devises designed to ensure your survival and a world seemingly run by giant computer servers; the artists in this show offer a prescient window into a world that not only may be, but in some places, already exists. Artists include Lisa Adams, Libby Clarke, Daniel Dove, Trygve Faste, Sean Higgins, Kelly McLane,  Thomas Muller and Klutch Stanaway. Additional events in conjunction for this exhibition taking place in Art and Design Center Rm 300 (Purple Crit Room) are as follows: November 5: Lecture,  Libby Clarke  — 10 am November 5-8 Workshops with Libby Clarke  — Time TBD Our write-up in LA Weekly: Disney’s Tomorrowland Inspires an Art Show by Annie Tucker, Thursday, Nov 29 2012

Bread-and-butter work can make or break a designer

Think of this as a primer for the novice designer and a call back to arms for the experienced art director. For those of you unfamiliar with design work, there are different chunks to be done. There is the high-level thinking where you come up with ideas, there is sketching where you develop your ideas visually, and finally there is production, where most of the thinking has already been done and all you do is implement the design. In general, production is viewed as the least challenging from a design point of view, and it usually falls upon the lower-level employees to complete it. For the most part, I call the routine, lower-level stuff bread-and-butter work as it puts a lot of food on the table. I used to work in a small agency where I handled all of the interaction design. Occasionally, I had access to interns who could do the grunt work for me, and certainly, these were respites from the crush of jobs. I started to think that perhaps I needed to find …